Special Feature: Climate Change Impacts: Fish, Fisheries and Fisheries Management

Collection launched: 07 Apr 2016

Guest Editors

Kenneth F. Drinkwater, Institute of Marine Science, Bergen, Norway
Røgnvaldur Hannesson, Norges Handelshøyskole, (NHH) Norwegian School of Economics, Bergen, Norway

Assessing the impacts of climate change
The atmosphere and oceans are warming, seasonal sea ice is retreating and salinity and ocean circulation patterns are changing, all of which can impact fish populations. Largely using comparative analyses, this Special Feature examines some of the effects of climate changes on fish stocks in the northern hemisphere, particular in the Northeast Atlantic and around the continental United States. It considers what marine ecosystems may look like under anthropogenic climate change and how existing fisheries management strategies, such as Harvest Control Rules, may fare in the future. It also notes some potential economic and societal consequences of climate change.

Additional articles under review

Collection Articles

Research Article
Harvest control rules in modern fisheries management
Sturla F. Kvamsdal, Arne Eide, Nils-Arne Ekerhovd, Katja Enberg, Asta Gudmundsdottir, Alf Håkon Hoel, Katherine E. Mills, Franz J. Mueter, Lars Ravn-Jonsen, Leif K. Sandal, Jan Erik Stiansen,Niels Vestergaard

Research Article
Causes and consequences of fleet diversity in fisheries: The case of the Norwegian Barents Sea cod fishery
Arne Eide 

Research Article
Nutrient-driven poleward expansion of the Northeast Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) stock: A new hypothesis
Selma V. Pacariz, Hjálmar Hátún, Jan Arge Jacobsen, Clare Johnson, Sólva Eliasen, Francisco Rey

Research Article
Seasonal phytoplankton blooms in the North Atlantic linked to the overwintering strategies of copepods
Kevin D. Friedland, Nicholas R. Record, Rebecca G. Asch, Trond Kristiansen, Vincent S. Saba, Kenneth F. Drinkwater, Stephanie Henson, Robert T. Leaf, Ryan E. Morse, David G. Johns, Scott I. Large, Solfrid S. Hjøllo, Janet A. Nye, Mike A. Alexander, Rubao Ji