Special Feature: Deltas in the Anthropocene

 

 

COLLECTION ARTCILES

Research Article
Evolving deltas: Coevolution with engineered interventions
A. C. Welch, R. J. Nicholls, A. N. Lázár

Research Article
River delta shoreline reworking and erosion in the Mediterranean and Black Seas: the potential roles of fluvial sediment starvation and other factors
Manon Besset, Edward J. Anthony, François Sabatier

Research Article
Food and nutrition security trends and challenges in the Ganges Brahmaputra Meghna (GBM) delta
Arnout van Soesbergen, Kristine Nilsen, Neil D. Burgess, Sylvia Szabo, Zoë Matthews

Research Article
Doomed to drown? Sediment dynamics in the human-controlled floodplains of the active Bengal Delta
Kimberly G. Rogers, Irina Overeem

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collection launched: 20 Oct 2016

Guest Editors

Irina Overeem, University of Colorado at Boulder, USA
Fabrice Renaud, United Nations University, Bonn, Germany
Paola Passalacqua, The University of Texas at Austin, USA 

Multidisciplinary analyses of complex systems

Deltas account for approximately 1% of global land area but are home to more than 500 million people. Deltas play a key role in agricultural and aquaculture production, food security, and commerce – yet, deltas are amongst the world’s most threatened socio-ecological systems, a situation projected to amplify in the 21st century due to both natural and anthropogenic impacts on the environment. This Special Feature invites contributions that advance research on deltas as complex systems, develop integrated frameworks for delta dynamics modeling, explore quantitative metrics of vulnerability and resilience of social-ecological systems, consider policy and governance issues linked to the sustainable development of deltas, and use in-situ and satellite data for guiding modeling and risk assessment. Analysis of challenges under projected scenarios of change of specific deltas are especially welcome. The deadline for submission is October 15th, 2016.